Tuesday, 24 June 2014

Cultist Goth

I'd recently promised you an interesting post and here it is! I think it's interesting anyway, I hope you agree with me or else I'm being enthusiastic for no good reason.
Anyway, lately my personal style has been changing and evolving a lot. If you've been following me for a while, you might have noticed that I do like some change in my clothes and that my style has changed quite a lot over the years. You may also have noticed that I am quite the Lovecraft fan - I adore Lovecraftian horror in every way and even if it's made kind of cutesy or hilarious, I might just love it (see: Welcome to Night Vale).

Friends and me in our Ovate hoodies at WGT. Can you guess who I am? Hint: I'm short. Picture is taken by my friend Izzy.

I'm that much of a Lovecraft fan that lately I've been trying to incorporate it in my clothing. You might have noticed that I 'dressed up' as a fashionable cultist to go to a convention. We all know that secretly I was just going as myself. Of course, credit where credit's due, my growing enthusiasm for 'cultist goth' (totally coining that term) is also thanks to my friend Nevel, who has been dressing fashionably Lovecraftian for way longer than me. Generally, my take on cultist goth is also heavily influenced by nugoth.
But enough about me, it's time to elaborate on this style! How does one dress like a cultist yet look terrific?
Let me warn you: I am still exploring this style. Feel free to give me tips on how you would go about looking like a fashionable cultist. Oh and obviously the pictures are just used as an illustration of parts of cultist goth since cultist goth does not actually exist (yet) except in my mind.

On Wednesdays We Wear Black
This one sort of goes without saying: take something black, add another black item and add some more black. Or at least use very dark colours; possibly dark browns and greys would work as well.

Go with the Flow
Anything flowy is good. Long dresses are excellent, wide trousers will work too, and long flowy skirts are my personal favourite. For skirts I imagine it may be hard giving of the cultist vibe in a miniskirt, but please do prove me wrong. You could always add a tight top or shirt over a skirt or a wide pair of trousers. Experimenting with combining tight and wide things is always a good idea.


 Source: Ovate.ca

Layers
Layering generally works really well if you're already wearing a few flowy items. Layering is not my forte, so I'm just going to say that it's not obligatory, heh.

Hooded Figures
Ever seen a cultist? (Well, me neither, but you know what I mean.) They wear hoods. Big, scary, black, face-covering hoods. This, for me, is a crucial part of the outfit, also because I just love hoods so damn much. 

Source: Auxiliary Magazine
Accessories
Generally, just keep it simple. Add in a few Lovecraftian references (I own an octopus necklace which sort of works) or strange symbols (ankhs are great). And you can never go wrong with big, dark scarves.

Make-up
If you want you make-up to suggest 'cultist' as well, I would recommend using dark colours (again). That does not mean that you need to do your most agressive smokey eye, but just dark (smudged) eyeliner and eyepencil will do as well. A grey or brown eyeshadow also sounds like a good idea. And if you want to go all out, contour your face with dark-grey to look like you have sunken cheeks.

I hope you liked my interpretation of cultist goth - feel free to comment with suggestions!

Friday, 13 June 2014

Goth: The True Story of Post-punk

Last week I got an email informing me of the existence of an upcoming non-fiction book with an in depth history of our beloved goth scene. If you're a bit of a geek, like me, I'm sure you're interested in the origin of our subculture and in that case, Goth: The True Story of Post-punk might just be exactly what you're looking for.

"One of the most fascinating musical periods in recent history was the time just after punk. Sadly, many of the best bands from this period have never had the recognition they deserve – the goth scene has been removed from music's historical narrative. This book will be a major work that redresses this oversight and underlines the cultural power of, arguably, the key movement of that period."

Source: Unbound
Plenty has been written about several aspects of our scene but until now, there hasn't exactly been a book that wraps the musical history up nicely and tells the entire story. Goth: The True Story of Post-punk sounds extremely promising in that aspect, as it focusses very specifically on the musical influences and origins of (post-)punk and goth. It also investigates the art, literature and even architecture that all of our favourite bands sprouted from and its influences in more modern music.

The author, John Robb, has played in the punk band The Membranes for a few decades and can be considered an authority on the matter; he has already written several books on music, one of those being Punk: An Oral History. He promises to elaborate on the bands that were crucial for the emergence of the post-punk and goth scene, as well as some forgotten gems that sadly got lost somewhere along the way.

Check out their Unbound page and do consider to pledge this promising project.